Tag Archives: vision

See? Meetups work! Stuff happens!

Transcript:
Just thought I’d do a quick follow-up to my last post, in which I was plugging the value of attending live events, like meetups.

Just last night, we had the first local event in the South West Aerospace Hackers meet-up. That’s one that I jointly kicked off, literally just a week ago, having publicized the meetup on Meetup.com and elsewhere, and on LinkedIn. Have already had about 20 people register, and 10 people show up, just a week.

There was a really really good buzz in the room. We met in a local watering hole. Good buzz! Lots of talk, lot of frustrations shared. People started to plot, and hatch ideas for how they can rejig, replan their own careers, but also other projects and initiatives. Lots of good stuff shared there. The next event is already scheduled for about a month away.

Continue reading See? Meetups work! Stuff happens!

Security or Significance? Choose.

Here’s an article which will probably both ring true with you, and disturb you at the same time.

The essential point is, an awful lot of people, in an awful lot of walks of life, seem to find themselves doing work that is peripheral, or completely disconnected, from what they value, and from what they thought their employer was all about.

And it leaves them feeling worthless, unvalued, unhappy, even ashamed.

They do it because it keeps them alive, and it provides enough income.

The world of traditional aerospace, being by its very nature traditional, conservative, and bottom-line-oriented, is no exception.

It is therefore worthwhile asking oneself the following question then, no matter what stage in your life and career you find yourself:

Which matters more to me: Security? Or significance?

Because if security (of lifestyle, income, schedule, etc) matters more, you had better have some tolerance for doing work that you don’t value. For at least some of the time.

Conversely, if significance matters more to you, you will have to keep your wits about you, and be prepared to take bold action when required.

Because the inevitable trend is towards work that is dull, commoditized, and security-oriented.

The action you will need to take will include refusal to do work that doesn’t matter to you, or to the people you care about.

That’s risky, of course. Security goes out the window, at least for a while.

Though if you stick to your guns, in the long run, security might come back in the front door, and you get the best of both worlds.

Whatever the case, ask yourself the question. And choose.

Look out, aerospace, Amazon and The Crowd are coming your way

Amazon’s last quarterly report announced an enhancement to Amazon Web Services (AWS) called CloudHSM.

It will be “a new service enabling customers to increase data security and meet compliance requirements.”

How long before we can design an aircraft entirely on the basis of crowd-sourcing and Amazon Web Services?

How long before we can design an airliner that way?

I’m thinking . . . . . Not long.

Discuss.

The game just changed for the aerospace engineer

I just saw something yesterday that made me realize:

Things are changing even faster than I thought.

Freelancer is a site that does just what it says on the tin: Connects people and businesses who need specific work done, with the people who can do that work, wherever in the world they are.

Nothing new. Guru, eLance and oDesk have been doing it for the last decade.

What came as a surprise to me was the kind or work being offered on Freelancer. The eLances and oDesks of the world have until now mainly been useful for copywriting, SEO, web dev, software coding, graphic design, etc. Never the “harder” technical stuff, and certainly not the engineering disciplines within aerospace. That has typically been packaged up and “thrown over the wall” to lower-cost firms, often in cheaper countries.

Not until now, that is.

Continue reading The game just changed for the aerospace engineer

A simple recipe for innovation

Earlier this week, I attended a TEDx conference, sponsored by Airbus

There were several speakers. A few now-famous TED talk videos were shown.

One presentation really stood out. An economist named Martin Klettke, now working for Airbus, illustrated his approach to innovation.

An economist? Innovate? In a technical, aerospace environment? Blasphemy.

It’s not hard if you’re Martin Klettke.

It’s not hard if you dare to think differently.

Here are some of Martin’s one-liners that have stuck in my head every since:

Continue reading A simple recipe for innovation

Vision

(What follows below is a guest post by Olivia Stodiecke, a PhD student in aeroelasticity at U of Bristol, and previously a structural analyst at Airbus.)

Vision creates the spark, the excitement that lifts an organization out of the mundane. Shared vision fosters risk taking and experimentation. People know what needs to be done. Even if they don’t know how to do it, they keep experimenting till they succeed. But even when they experiment, there is no ambiguity at all. It’s perfectly clear why they are doing it.

The Fifth Discipline – Peter M Senge

(Here a link with the full first chapter of the book – worth reading: http://www.vedpuriswar.org/book_review/the_fifth_discipline.PDF )

For me, Vision = Something to inspire us techies now and in the future; something that we can all understand and be proud to aim for; something that can shape a business strategy ( … not a list of random incomprehensible bullet points in a powerpoint presentation labelled with vision 2050  … and not a visually attractive animation taken straight out of a cheap science fiction movie)

Continue reading Vision